Saturday, September 10, 2016

Warm - textile art project

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WARM – textile art project

WARM is a textile art project running from Saturday 3 September 2016 to Sunday 25 September 2016 10.00am to 5pm daily, at the Art Gallery of Ballarat in Australia, entry is free.
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Copyright ABC News: Michael Barnett
The project is about our over-use of fossil fuels for heating and power, and offers an alternative that is fun and community driven. We have become so dependent on fossil fuel that we’ve forgotten how to warm ourselves with wool. The lament of a Western District sheep farmer has been spun out as the basis for WARM, a Sustainable Environment Arts Movement (SEAM) textile art project.
More than 200 knitters from across Australia and around the world, including a refugee Group from Germany, have created hundreds of knitted pieces including gum trees, native flowers and wind turbines to create an enormous collage which shows a landscape reclaimed from the devastating effects of environmental degradation.
The exhibition includes original artworks of the degraded and the renewed landscape by local artist Lars Stenberg. The components of the landscape have been designed by Georgie Nicolson of tikki designs.
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The first painting by Lars Stenberg depicts an Australian landscape devastated by coal mining.
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The second shows the same landscape, regenerated and bursting with life.
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Copyright ABC News: Michael Barnett
The Ballarat knitting installation uses only natural wool and every piece in the wool work is desigend to be reused, some pieces of the background can be used as mittens and beanies. The gum leaves can be used as bookmarks.
Hardcopies of the WARM pattern book can be purchased through the Art Gallery of Ballarat and the National Wool Museum Shop in Geelong.

TRIVIA

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The city of Ballarat is a city located on the Yarrowee River and lower western plains of the Great Dividing Range in the state of Victoria, Australia it is the state’s most populated inland settlement, and third most populated inland settlement in Australia. It was named by Scottish squatter Archibald Yuille who established the first settlement in 1837. His sheep run was called Ballaarat which is thought to mean “resting place” in the local Wathaurong Aboriginal.
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Ballarat became one of the most significant bomstowns in Victorian Australia. From late August 1851 news spread that Ballarat had become a goldfield and this was the catalyst for rapid immigration to the district. Many aspired to find gold and providing for their needs was an opportunity for entrepreneurs to capitalise on the sudden influx of population.
Clusters of canvas dwellings sprung up and the ground was honeycombed with muddy holes and mounds of wash dirt from alluvial mining. Accents from all over the world could be heard on the goldfields as migrants flooded in hoping to make their fortune.
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In the summer of 1854-1855 thousands of the miners on the Ballarat Diggings protested against the cost of mining licences and the arbitrary manner in which inspections were carried out by police behaving badly. The more militant amongst them organised training and weapons to resist the authorities, and built the Eureka Stockade on the Eureka Lead as a barricade for their own protection. Before dawn on Sunday the 3rd of December 1854, the march from the Government Camp began. Armed soldiers from British Army units attacked the Stockade supported by mounted and foot police. This sudden battle resulted in about 30 deaths and the arrest of some 120 diggers.
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The Eureka Treason Trials held in Melbourne before juries in February and March 1855 led to the acquittal of all those accused. The diggers may have lost the battle but they won the war for political reforms. In 1855 men who held miner’s rights were qualified to vote in the Electoral District of Ballarat in the Police District of Ballarat. The Eureka Rebellion was the only armed rebellion in Australian history and  resulted in the first male suffrage in Australia being instituted and as such Eureka is interpreted by some as the origin of democracy in Australia.
The wealth from gold made Ballarat the richest place on earth for a time but it was the energy and drive of the new settlers who brought institutions and organisations into being. That first generation of immigrants were ‘can-do’ people who found ways to overcome obstacles and to work towards a much better way of life than they would have had back in their old countries.
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